About By Allison Floyd

Authored 499 articles.

    Articles

  • Cotton Growers Look to Save Costs in Down Year

    Features, March 27, 2015

    Early next week, producers across the country will get a clearer idea of the size and makeup of the 2015 crop, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture releases the Prospective Planting Report, a survey of what farmers across the country say they intend to plant.

  • Ag Committee Considering Cost of GMO Labeling

    Features, March 26, 2015

    How much would GMO labeling cost? That’s the question the House Agriculture Committee is asking in a hearing this week. In 2014, 125 bills mandating the labeling of biotechnology were introduced in 30 different states.

  • Access to Land Still Young Farmers’ Biggest Worry

    Features, March 24, 2015

    The biggest challenge on young farmers’ minds is finding enough land to grow crops and raise animals in the future, according to the producers who responded to a survey by American Farm Bureau Federation’s Young Farmers & Ranchers program. Those young farmers also are worried about profitability, taxes, water and finding financing.

  • In This Farm Family, the Farmer is Mom

    Farmer Profiles, March 23, 2015

    Kristen Nickerson is a farm wife and a farm mom. … She’s a farmer and she’s a wife and she’s a mother. “For most people, farm wife means you are the farmer’s wife,” said Nickerson, who runs a 3,000-acre grain and swine farm with her brother and sister in Kent County, Maryland. “It’s usually the man who is the farmer in the family.

  • In This Farm Family, the Farmer is Mom

    Features, March 23, 2015

    Kristen Nickerson is a farm wife and a farm mom. … She’s a farmer and she’s a wife and she’s a mother. “For most people, farm wife means you are the farmer’s wife,” said Nickerson, who runs a 3,000-acre grain and swine farm with her brother and sister in Kent County, Maryland. “It’s usually the man who is the farmer in the family.

  • Can GMO and Organic Live Side by Side? USDA Thinks So

    Features, March 20, 2015

    Farmers who only grow organic and farmers who use genetically engineered plants can coexist. An effort through the U.S. Department of Agriculture has focused for the past few years on mapping out ways to help different growers coexist without infringing on each other’s business.

  • In Nutrition Debate, Meat Group Says, ‘Hands off My Hot Dog’

    Features, March 19, 2015

    Meat producers are using their voices – and a little bit of humor – to make sure that federal officials know they don’t want climate politics to get involved in the setting of dietary guidelines.

  • USDA: Family-Owned Farms Drive American Agriculture

    Features, March 18, 2015

    The vast majority of farms in the United States are family-owned, and the most recent Census of Agriculture shows it. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service is pointing out that 97 percent of American farms are family-owned.

  • This is the Week to Honor a Farmer

    Features, March 17, 2015

    Wednesday is National Ag Day, the day set aside each year for communities to celebrate agriculture and its impact on Americans’ lives. Started 42 years ago, the Agriculture Council of America aims to increase the public’s awareness of agriculture's vital role in our society. Celebrations range from huge events in the nation’s capital to tiny parades in rural towns.

  • Bird Flu Confirmed Further East

    Features, March 16, 2015

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed a deadly strain of avian flu further east than before, leaving poultry producers to worry that the disease could spread to high production states east of the Mississippi.

  • Profile: ‘Farm Mom’ a Dream Job for Pugh

    Farmer Profiles, March 13, 2015

    Bethany Pugh is an office manager, chauffer, teacher, volunteer, cook, accountant, veterinary technician and housekeeper. In short, she’s a farm mom. Last year, Pugh was named the top Farm Mom for the Southeast region in the annual America's Farmers Mom of the Year contest put on by American Agri-Women and Monsanto.

  • Profile: ‘Farm Mom’ a Dream Job for Pugh

    Features, March 13, 2015

    Bethany Pugh is an office manager, chauffer, teacher, volunteer, cook, accountant, veterinary technician and housekeeper. In short, she’s a farm mom. Last year, Pugh was named the top Farm Mom for the Southeast region in the annual America's Farmers Mom of the Year contest put on by American Agri-Women and Monsanto.

  • Court Orders Cotton Farmer to Pay Monsanto for Collecting Seed

    Features, March 12, 2015

    A federal court judge has ordered a Tifton cotton farmer to pay $360,000 to Monsanto after the company accused him of saving and delinting cotton seed for himself and other South Georgia farmers.

  • Antibiotic-Free Chicken Seems Inevitable

    Features, March 10, 2015

    McDonald’s announcement last week that the company will begin sourcing chicken raised without antibiotics may signal that the overall industry is headed in that direction, though some poultry companies already are there.

  • Ag Leaders Head to Cuba to Support Trade

    Features, March 09, 2015

    A week after a bill was introduced into the U.S. Senate to open trade with Cuba, a delegation of powerful agriculture leaders visited the island nation last week for meetings, to court business partners and to push U.S. lawmakers to lift the long-running embargo. The U.S. Agriculture Coalition for Cuba, a group of powerful ag companies including Cargill, put together the trip.

  • Immigration Enforcement without Reform Hurts Farms

    Features, March 06, 2015

    As the U.S. House of Representatives takes up immigration changes that could make farm labor harder to find, American Farm Bureau Federation is asking for reform first and urging citizens to learn the positive impact immigrants have in their state. On Thursday, AFBF tweeted a link to an interactive map by Partnership for a New American Economy showing the impact of immigrants in individual states.

  • Study Refutes Claim that COOL Hurts Canadian Producers

    Features, March 03, 2015

    Mandatory country-of-origin labeling for beef and other meats has not cost other countries the billions of dollars in lost business that they claim, according to an Auburn University professor’s analysis of almost 30 years’ worth of U.S. cattle import and price data.

  • Auburn Grad Takes Helm of Peanut Producers Group

    Farmer Profiles, March 02, 2015

    When Caleb Bristow was a boy, he loved to hang out at his father’s peanut-buying point in Columbia, Ala. “When I was a kid, Daddy ran a buying point for Golden Peanut and that was a time I looked forward to each year,” said Bristow. “I got to take samples and check the moisture to see if the peanuts were dry coming out of the field or needed to go through the dryers before being graded.

  • Auburn Grad Takes Helm of Peanut Producers Group

    Features, March 02, 2015

    When Caleb Bristow was a boy, he loved to hang out at his father’s peanut-buying point in Columbia, Ala. “When I was a kid, Daddy ran a buying point for Golden Peanut and that was a time I looked forward to each year,” said Bristow. “I got to take samples and check the moisture to see if the peanuts were dry coming out of the field or needed to go through the dryers before being graded.

  • Christian Farmers Share Good News with Walking Sticks

    Features, February 26, 2015

    With some sort of winter weather predicted Wednesday afternoon, Walter Powell was leaving Cracker Barrel in Birmingham, Ala., hoping to get to Memphis, Tenn., before snow started to fall. It wasn’t great weather for a long drive, he agreed, but the Mid-South Farm & Gin Show was scheduled to start Friday, and he wanted to get there to hand out walking sticks.

  • Ag Students Begin to Study Drones as MTSU Adds Degree Program

    Features, February 24, 2015

    In the next few years, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) will create high-paying jobs for around 70,000 Americans, many of them in agribusiness. And one of the first universities to turn out those young professionals will be Middle Tennessee State University, which launched a new UAS degree program this year.

  • Experts Give Tips to Prevent Yield Loss in Soybeans

    Features, February 23, 2015

    Without a clear winner among commodities next year, many agriculture economists are predicting some growers will shift acres from corn and cotton to soybeans in 2015. While the USDA has projected that soybean acres will drop slightly in 2015, business and crop consultants expect soybean acreage will be much higher.

  • USDA: Farmers Will Plant Less Acres in 2015

    Features, February 20, 2015

    U.S. farmers will plant less of … well, most everything, in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s acting chief economist. Robert Johansson’s comments on Thursday surprised some analysts, who have been predicting that growers would choose less expensive crops, but still plant as many acres as they did last year.

  • Controlling Invasive Species Takes Nationwide Effort

    Features, February 19, 2015

    Next week is National Invasive Species Awareness Week, a time when weed and insect experts urge the public to be aware of the plants and insects that can take over a landscape and push out crops or native species.

  • Ag Could Benefit as Talks Progress with Cuba

    News, February 18, 2015

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