About By Allison Floyd

Authored 516 articles.

    Articles

  • Farmers Catching up on Planting after Rains

    Features, April 24, 2015

    Producers across much of the Southeast are a few days late planting corn this April, after a week of drenching rains kept them out of the field. Whether the rain delay will alter their overall planting plans remains to be seen.

  • EU Proposes Rule to Allow Countries to Reject GMO Food

    Features, April 23, 2015

    A proposal that would allow European countries to ban genetically engineered crops – even if the European Union deemed them safe – has pleased neither agriculture interests or anti-GMO groups.

  • Poultry Experts Head to Minnesota to Help with Avian Flu Response

    News, April 22, 2015

  • Wisconsin Governor Declares State of Emergency over Avian Flu

    News, April 21, 2015

  • VSG Ready to Protect Farmers’ Yield with Agriculture Drones

    Features, April 20, 2015

    Eight years ago, Ben Worley was in charge of a team developing an unmanned aerial system to scout out enemy locations in order to protect fellow soldiers and Marines. Today, the former Air Force officer again is leading a team looking for enemies in the field – enemies that could steal away a farmer’s yield.

  • El Niño Will Impact the Field

    Features, April 17, 2015

    El Niño is here and it very likely will continue through the summer. Better prepare for it. Forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration updated the El Niño outlook this week, predicting that the climate pattern now has a 70% chance of continuing through the summer.

  • Tri-State Extension Program Helps Goat Producers

    Features, April 16, 2015

    The demand for goat meat is growing in this country and likely will flourish as immigrants move and bring their cultural heritage with them, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  • More Bird Flu Cases in Minnesota, Nearly 2 Dozen Total

    News, April 15, 2015

  • 1st Avian Flu Case Confirmed in U.S. Chicken Flock

    Features, April 14, 2015

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed a case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a chicken flock, the first time the strain has infected commercial chickens in this country in more than 30 years.

  • California Drought Driving Interest in Southern Pecans

    Features, April 13, 2015

    If anyone asked advice from Dan Zedan a few years ago, he’d tell him to go into almonds. Today, he’d say pecans. “It’s a great time to be in the pecan business,” he said. Zedan owns Nature’s Finest Foods, a company that specializes in marketing tree nuts. He’s watched over the past few years as consumers started to shift their habits – even if they didn’t realize it.

  • Study Looks into Microbes Carried by Feral Hogs

    Features, April 10, 2015

    As if farmers needed another reason to hate feral hogs. Feral swine do millions of dollars in crop damage this time of year, rooting around in freshly planted fields and muddying up streams. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded a grant to a Georgia microbiologist to find out what kind of damage wild pigs leave behind that we can’t see.

  • Profile: Dairy Family Makes Homestead for Next Generation

    Farmer Profiles, April 06, 2015

    Jennifer Holle always knew she’d work with large animals. She just expected it to be horses. But, then she met Andrew Holle, an undergraduate working on a dairy science degree at the University of Minnesota at Crookston. “His adviser actually told him, ‘Stay away from those horse girls,’” Jennifer jokes. “But once we started dating, things went very quickly. He brought me back to his family’s farm and said, ‘This is what I’m coming back to.’

  • Profile: Dairy Family Makes Homestead for Next Generation

    Features, April 06, 2015

    Jennifer Holle always knew she’d work with large animals. She just expected it to be horses. But, then she met Andrew Holle, an undergraduate working on a dairy science degree at the University of Minnesota at Crookston. “His adviser actually told him, ‘Stay away from those horse girls,’” Jennifer jokes. “But once we started dating, things went very quickly. He brought me back to his family’s farm and said, ‘This is what I’m coming back to.’

  • More Cases of Bird Flu; USDA Developing Vaccine

    Features, April 03, 2015

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed another case of highly contagious avian influenza in commercial poultry – this time in Beadle County, South Dakota. The flock of 53,000 turkeys is located within the Central flyway, where a similar strain was discovered earlier this year.

  • AgSouth Grant Helps Tiny Market Grow to Largest in State

    Features, April 02, 2015

    Nine years ago, the Peachtree Road Farmers Market was just a gathering of a dozen farmers and gardeners getting together 20 weeks a year to sell their produce to neighborhood shoppers.

  • Expected Cotton Acreage Even Lower than Predicted

    Features, April 01, 2015

    Farmers intend to plant less cotton than they have in the past five years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Prospective Plantings report released Tuesday. Across the country, farmers said they plan to plant 9.55 million acres of cotton in 2015, down 13 percent from last year.

  • USDA Extends PLC/ARC Signup Deadline

    Features, March 30, 2015

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has extended the deadline to sign up for crop protection programs for an additional week, saying that about 10 percent of farmers haven’t yet enrolled in a safety net program.

  • Cotton Growers Look to Save Costs in Down Year

    Features, March 27, 2015

    Early next week, producers across the country will get a clearer idea of the size and makeup of the 2015 crop, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture releases the Prospective Planting Report, a survey of what farmers across the country say they intend to plant.

  • Ag Committee Considering Cost of GMO Labeling

    Features, March 26, 2015

    How much would GMO labeling cost? That’s the question the House Agriculture Committee is asking in a hearing this week. In 2014, 125 bills mandating the labeling of biotechnology were introduced in 30 different states.

  • Access to Land Still Young Farmers’ Biggest Worry

    Features, March 24, 2015

    The biggest challenge on young farmers’ minds is finding enough land to grow crops and raise animals in the future, according to the producers who responded to a survey by American Farm Bureau Federation’s Young Farmers & Ranchers program. Those young farmers also are worried about profitability, taxes, water and finding financing.

  • In This Farm Family, the Farmer is Mom

    Farmer Profiles, March 23, 2015

    Kristen Nickerson is a farm wife and a farm mom. … She’s a farmer and she’s a wife and she’s a mother. “For most people, farm wife means you are the farmer’s wife,” said Nickerson, who runs a 3,000-acre grain and swine farm with her brother and sister in Kent County, Maryland. “It’s usually the man who is the farmer in the family.

  • In This Farm Family, the Farmer is Mom

    Features, March 23, 2015

    Kristen Nickerson is a farm wife and a farm mom. … She’s a farmer and she’s a wife and she’s a mother. “For most people, farm wife means you are the farmer’s wife,” said Nickerson, who runs a 3,000-acre grain and swine farm with her brother and sister in Kent County, Maryland. “It’s usually the man who is the farmer in the family.

  • Can GMO and Organic Live Side by Side? USDA Thinks So

    Features, March 20, 2015

    Farmers who only grow organic and farmers who use genetically engineered plants can coexist. An effort through the U.S. Department of Agriculture has focused for the past few years on mapping out ways to help different growers coexist without infringing on each other’s business.

  • In Nutrition Debate, Meat Group Says, ‘Hands off My Hot Dog’

    Features, March 19, 2015

    Meat producers are using their voices – and a little bit of humor – to make sure that federal officials know they don’t want climate politics to get involved in the setting of dietary guidelines.

  • USDA: Family-Owned Farms Drive American Agriculture

    Features, March 18, 2015

    The vast majority of farms in the United States are family-owned, and the most recent Census of Agriculture shows it. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service is pointing out that 97 percent of American farms are family-owned.

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